The Secret Life Of The Manic Depressive

54 minutes 9.2/10

Part 1

Stephen Fry explores the world of manic depression, a mental illness which affects up to 4 million people in the UK, including himself. He sets out to uncover more about a misunderstood condition which drives those who have it from extreme highs to crippling lows.

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  • Anonymous

    Watching this documentary was a huge eye-opener. In Fry’s and some of the other peoples’ stories, I saw what I have been experiencing for quite some time. I just thought I was going insane, but now I know that’s not truth, and that I just have a mental illness.

  • pia andersen

    A tough story told by one heck of a storyteller. As we say in danish: Han er en første klasses formidler. (He´s a first class communicator). My dad is bi-polar, and I have lived with his and my grandmothers disease all my life. I hvae always saught new knowledge about the ways to treat or handle, or cope with. This gave me insight in how it is to live as bi-polar.

  • Anonymous

    I think it was an elegant, British documentary. I think the reality of this sickness is more cruel. Being manic is not only about shopping too much/too many shirts…it is about cheating your partner, as it comes with hyper sexuality. It comes with destroying families and leaving grief, despair and destroyed people behind you, separations, children suffering, genetic heredity is extremely serious, not as presented in this documentary. It comes with horrible psychotic episodes, with loosing friends, old good friends. It comes with lies, huge, often lies, with manipulations, with “walking on eggs shell” around them in order not to infuriate them, etc. So they may say NO to press the button that will eventually released them, but the people around them I think we would press the button, if ever had the option. If they do not take the medicine, they not only destroy their life, they destroy the lives of their family members. Do not forget the suicides. I feel the film was only a peak of an iceberg. The huge rest of the sickness’s face rest uncovered in the deep water.

  • Someone Else

    I ran into the oppsite situation, which I’ve learned is also true for over a million innocent American children, merely due to the greed and/or ignorance of American psychiatrists. I had the adverse effects of an antidepressant (in my case given for smoking cessation, not depression) misdiagnosed as bipolar. And I can tell you the bipolar drugs can cause psychosis, when one is put on them inappropriately. And they cause drug withdrawal induced “super sensitivity” mania once one is weaned off of them. This film ended with a “bipolar” guy who’d never been medicated implying medication would be beneficial. Trust me, the medications cause the symptoms of the illness in healthy people, they’re not beneficial. And this documentary would likely never have been made if the guy had suffered what the UN now claims is “torture,” forced psychiatric drug treatment.

  • shyam

    mania and depression both are disorders of thought processing. we often try to control or alter the thought processing by using medications. which I have been taking for about 10 years. but in fact our thoughts can never be controlled by medication, we can try to suppress them temporarily, and the situation worsen when stress comes. I think that than taking medication try to learn to manupulate the thoughts. Best way is meditation, I am practicing meditation for one year and it has really benifited me, in keeping mind calm and cool. Learn it try it, may be this is what you were waiting for.

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