A Simpler Way: Crisis as Opportunity

A Simpler Way: Crisis as Opportunity

79 minutes 2016 8.7/10 based on 6 votes

The history of industrialization has proven that limitless economic growth, advanced technology, and material affluence are the keys to financial prosperity. However, this way of thinking has turned out to be a huge failure for most people and for the planet as well.

Have you ever wondered if there’s another way to live? Probably one we haven’t quite figured out yet? A way that is completely different to the way we grew up or the way that we have grown accustomed to?

In October 2014, an invitation was made for people to participate in a one-year living experiment that was called The Simpler Way Project. The objective was to explore simpler ways of living on a beautiful property in Australia. The idea was to try to counteract some of the environmental, economic, and cultural crises our society currently faces. Three months later, a small community was formed in order to put into practice the ideas of simple living, permaculture, and natural building. This film tells the stories of the brave men and women who embraced the challenge.

Each individual had his or her own reasons for participating in the project. But they all seemed to agree on the fact that they were unhappy with the way in which the environment is being treated and were ready to explore alternatives. Some of them wanted to put into practice their personal convictions about the benefits of living in a less complicated society. Getting caught up in the rat race might seem exciting at first but eventually, it takes its toll physically, emotionally, and spiritually. Although some seem to not mind spending entire decades of their lives wasting away behind a desk or stuck in traffic, there’s a group of individuals who not only dream about a better way of living but who are willing to make it happen as well as to experience it.

The community was called Wurruk’an. Wurruk is a local indigenous word that means earth and story and k’an is the Mayan word for seed.

The project relied on the participants’ ability to be self-reliant. So instead of sitting around waiting for solutions to come from somewhere else, they built their own houses, practiced organic gardening, and interacted responsibly with nature. Watch this inspiring film now.

GD Star Rating
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Rating: 8.7/10 based on 6 votes

Discuss This Documentary

  • Carlyle Reedy

    I am nearly 80 and would like to live in a tiny house.

  • David Weinstock

    I was very impressed with their lifestyle and sustainable philosophies, until I saw that they were slaughtering chickens (possibly other animals too), apparently blissfully unaware that not only is that a completely unenlightened state of mind, animal-agriculture is also responsible for the vast majority of greenhouse gas emissions, ocean dead zones, and destruction of habitat worldwide. Very sad.

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